Putting “nurture vs nature” debates aside,  HOW we learn and work do start from our childhood.


I was called “the supervisor” by my dad’s production team of engineers and operators at his cable manufacturing plant. That was in the 1970s and I was always spending time inside the factory, loving how machines such as lathes produce copper power cables. We lived in a tiny makeshift home conjoining the factory, simple as it was, we kids loved it!

It was from then, in my junior school, even though I was always a creative artist since young, I developed an interest in science and technology. If not for my formative years pretending to be a supervisor on the vast factory plant, I won’t have a latter interest in the late 1970s as a computer programmer, or a budding biochemist and Apple Mac evangelist in the 1980s. When commercial Internet became available in 1990s, naturally I took on Webdev, and subsequently co-developing an email security server appliance, and completing my doctoral research in a UNIX-based business analysis system.

So, allow the young to freely embrace STEM, let them learn by “playing”, encourage them to like and then love science and tech.

PS – Yea, that is me in front of the now long defunct cable factory.